childrentvA media release by FamilyVoice Australia last week highlights parents' concerns about a push to end TV restrictions. Below is a copy of the release. 



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Parents alarmed by push to end TV restrictions



“Angry parents are telling us how strongly they oppose the new push by commercial TV stations to allow adult programs to be broadcast day and night, abolishing current time zones,” FamilyVoice Research Officer Ros Phillips said today.



“SA Attorney-General John Rau has spoken for many when he said he would be appalled if his children were exposed to material that displayed violence and blurred the lines with soft-core pornography.  He pointed out that it is unrealistic to expect parents to monitor every single program their kids watch on TV, particularly during school holidays.”



Mrs Phillips said a petition begun less than 24 hours ago, urging Communications spokesman Malcolm Turnbull to keep TV clean for kids, already has 140 signatures and counting.



Ruth Morrison of Launceston said: “I have sons, aged 7 and 4.  It would be very unhelpful for our family to have to deal with this change, and unhelpful to the healthy development of my sons.”



Ros Phillips said an increasing number of children are growing up in homes where parents are physically or mentally absent.  These parents are unlikely to use parental locks or direct children to ABC channels.



“Free TV is really saying that because children can now watch potentially harmful material on mobile phones and other devices, they should be able to watch it on TV,” Ros Phillips said.  “Hello??  We need to provide protection for children on the other outlets as well!”



Ros Phillips said that over the years, Free TV has been steadily watering down the TV Code of Practice.  The G time zones after school and daytime on weekends have already been abolished.  Content guidelines have been progressively made more vague and less enforceable,” Mrs Phillips said.  “The new proposal is yet another backward step.



“It’s hugely worrying because kids as young as 11 are already accessing pornography,” she said.  “The 60 per cent rise in ‘serious incidents of a sexual nature’ in SA schools over the past three years should be a wakeup call.”



MEDIA RELEASE, FAMILYVOICE AUSTRALIA, 12 SEPTEMBER 2013