Yesterday the ACL issued a media release about the interim findings of the Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families urging caution in accepting the results of the study. (see Too early to draw conclusions with same-sex parenting study: ACL )



Associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin Mark Regnerus has commented about the Australian results in National Review -  Assessing the Australian Study



Dr Regnerus research last year on adult children of parents who have same-sex relationships titled "How differing are the children of parents who have same-sex relationships? Findings from the New Family Structures Study" was published in the July 2012 issue of Social Science Research.



Assessing the Australian Study



By Mark Regnerus



“Children of same-sex parents are happier and have healthier familial relationships than their peers with parents in straight relationships,” or so says what is purported to be the world’s largest study on the children of same-sex parents. As always in this domain, I read the early media input about this with immediate interest — and a bit of skepticism, too, given the glowing, confident enthusiasm displayed online. So I went fishing for more information about the interim report — not readily locatable yet — and about the Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families (ACHESS) in general, and found information about its methodology here. To summarize (and quote from) it:

Initial recruitment will involve convenience sampling and snowball recruitment techniques. . . . This will include advertisements and media releases in gay and lesbian press, flyers at gay and lesbian social and support groups, and investigator attendance at gay and lesbian community events. . . . Primarily recruitment will be through emails posted on gay and lesbian community email lists aimed at same-sex parenting. This will include, but not be limited to, Gay Dads Australia and the Rainbow Families Council of Victoria.


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