Know your Candidates

To help Tasmanians know more about the candidates who will vote on your behalf in Parliament, we wrote to all the candidates from all the parties to ask them about several issues that are important to Christians.

Below are the answers from candidates who provided responses to our questioning so far.

Adam_Brooks.jpg

adam.brooks@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

 

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

Growing up in Devonport, I joined the Navy at 15. After 8 years of service I worked in the mining industry throughout remote Australia. After starting a maintenance consulting company, I returned home to Tasmania so my children could grow up in the place I love. After being frustrated by the direction Tasmania was heading in, I stood for election in 2010 and have been privileged to represent the community since then. My Christian beliefs and friends at my church give me a sound foundation for my role as a representative. I enjoy mountain biking, sport, fishing and shooting.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

To continue to create jobs and opportunity for everyone in the community, but in particular our youth. I understand the need to allow business to create the jobs we need and I will continue to focus on making sure those opportunities are available.

With the budget back on track I am also focused on ensuring we provide the services that those in need require. With my ongoing work within the community my focus is on delivering better health and education outcomes.  We have made significant improvements, however there is still a lot more to do.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have voted twice against the Euthanasia legislation in Parliament and my record and stance is very consistent. Whilst no one wants to see the suffering people face with terminal illness, voluntary euthanasia is a massive change for our community. I don’t feel there can be adequate protections put in place to legislate this change and as such my position has not changed. That is why I have voted against the previous legislation and would not support the same legislation into the future.  

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

As someone that cares and stands up for the community. Whilst I’m not your typical politician that fits the mould, I am there to make sure the community is represented. We live in a special place, and when I leave we should be in an even better place. My personal circumstances have been challenging recently, but through adversity we learn, and through our faith we know things will work out. I am not one to cut and run and there is a lot more to do. 

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Felix_Ellis_Template_1.jpg

felix.ellis@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I'm a plumber working on the West Coast and living with my partner Margot on the North-West Coast. I grew up in WA and fell in love with Tassie when my Mum moved here six years ago. My interests in my spare time are hiking, reading, chess and our surf club.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

My first priority is ensuring all high schools in Braddon are able to educate their students through to year 12. My second priority in Braddon is to encourage more jobs and investment, particularly small business.

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

Oppose.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

It’s very much for history to judge but I would hope that I had always put my community above myself and stayed true to my convictions.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Roger_Jaensch_TEmplate_1.jpg

roger.jaensch@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I live in Wynyard with my wife Stephanie and our three school-age children. I grew up in suburban Melbourne, studied Science at Monash University and worked in agriculture and rural development in Western Australia before moving to Tasmania in 2000 to set up the Cradle Coast Authority. I was elected in 2014 and have served as Government Whip and Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business, Trade and Red Tape Reduction in the Hodgman Government. I enjoy meals with my family, one-on-one time with my kids, camping, fishing and restoring old Land Rovers. Steph and I were born elsewhere, but Tasmania is our family’s home.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

More opportunities for people to have rewarding lives and careers in our region.  Improved health, education and employment statistics – more people willing and able to take advantage of the opportunities available to them

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I believe we can do a lot more to improve end of life care in Tasmania. I support the principle of voluntary euthanasia as part of the spectrum of care options available to people who are dying, and would consider any future bill to introduce such options on its merit, as I have in the past.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

By the things I did to make our region and Tasmania a better place to live.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Jeremy_Rockliff_Template_1.jpg

jeremy.rockliff@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

 

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I have lived and worked on the family farm at Sassafras prior to being elected to Parliament in 2002 as Member for Braddon.  I am currently Deputy Premier, and Minister for Education and Training, Primary Industries and Water, and Racing.  I have a strong sense of community values, and I’m a former Lifeline Telephone Counsellor, having volunteered for, and assisted many community organisations throughout my life.  I am married to Sandra and blessed with three children, now school-aged, Ruby, Lucy and Holly.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

Confidence in our economy leading to greater investment and more job opportunities.  An education system that leads the nation and prepares our young people to be lifelong learners and active and positive members of our community.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have not supported euthanasia legislation in 2009, 2013 and 2017, and my position will not change.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

A hard working person willing to go the extra mile to help people in need.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Joan_Rylah_Template_1.jpg

joan.rylah@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

 

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was elected in 2014 after an extensive and successful career in business (financial advice) and on the land (beef). I was educated at Smithton Primary, The Friends’ School and various tertiary institutions.  I am married to Roderick and have two adult children. As National Chairman of the Practitioners Division of the financial industry association, I led the implementation of Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) designation. This major and successful industry reform highlights my ability to lead and deliver strong outcomes. I believe in Christian values and I am committed to directly addressing the issues facing families.  I serve as Deputy Speaker/Chair of Committees and Government Whip. My interests are horse-riding (recreational), bushwalking, reading widely and travel in the outback.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

My top priorities are to create more jobs and opportunity for people and businesses.  I want services delivered in Braddon and to further unlock this region’s potential.  To achieve this we must create a strong, confident economy and grow our jobs and population.  Therefore it is my priority to have a clear plan, well defined and explained priorities and Budget discipline. 

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

My vote was and remains a NO vote.  My priority is to seek excellence in the delivery of Palliative Care throughout the state, especially in regional areas.

The protection of vulnerable persons, in particular, disabled people and the elderly, can only be achieved, in my view, by ensuring the wilful killing of another person is a criminal offence.  Self-initiated suicide, which involves the provision of the instruments and medication by another person, will lead to the killing of vulnerable people against their will.  I believe human life is sacrosanct.  Our focus must remain to eliminate pain and suffering for all, through excellence in palliation.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I seek to be remembered as a hard-working, approachable and empathetic politician who would take up the fight for my constituents and as a politician who helped create a thriving economy where hope and opportunity abounded; who was unquestionably conscience driven and remembered as authentic; who proudly represented the values of a significant portion of my constituency; who always remained true to my principles and values; who fought to create the best long-term social, environmental and economic outcomes for this state; and who firmly stood for the family as being the ideal social structure in which to raise children.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Scott_Jordan_-_450_x_600_clean-scr.jpg

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Information about Tasmanian Greens candidates is available at: https://greens.org.au/candidates/tas  

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

A prosperous, low-carbon economy powered by renewable energy, and a passionate voice for people with disabilities, refugees, children and marginalized Tasmanians.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.

Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of Tasmanians suffering from advanced, incurable, unrelievable suffering that palliation cannot alleviate to choose the time and manner of their death.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs.

Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support treating personal drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal issue.

The Greens will:

  • uphold criminal penalties, including imprisonment, for the supply of illicit drugs and the possession of illicit drugs above quantities consistent with personal use;
  • legislate civil sanctions for the personal use of illicit drugs to include diversion programs, compulsory treatment, education programs and penalties;
  • provide increased availability of diversion to rehabilitation, treatment and recovery programs as a sentencing alternative for people convicted of possession for personal use;

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania’s abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth.

Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post-24 weeks) abortions except when a mother’s life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Greens would oppose an amendment to repeal the provision of late term abortions. It is inconsistent with good medical practice for the following reasons:

  • it imposes an arbitrary definition of ‘late term’—24 weeks—which is inconsistent with best medical practice;
  • it attempts to legislate health care, and it will have many unintended consequences, including undermining the professional relationship between a patient and her doctor by requiring the doctor to do certain things even when those things are against his or her professional or ethical judgement; and
  • it does not take into account the last decades of advances in the way all aspects of pregnancy, including premature births, are now dealt with.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations’ current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

The Tasmanian Greens do not support any weakening of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998.

 

Do you agree with state funding of educational programmes that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme)?

Fact: Safe Schools does not teach radical gender theory. It is simply a program to help schools and students understand and respect that people should not be discriminated against for any reason - including gender and sexual diversity.

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of every child to feel safe from bullying, particularly at school.

The Safe Schools programme has been designed to ensure schools are safe places for all students, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) students, and are free of discrimination.

It was born out of the need identified by school communities, parents and teachers for greater support for LGBTI students, who are at higher risks of bullying and suicide, and to ensure that schools create safe and inclusive environments.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers.

A. Do you support legislating for a $1 bet limit?

B. What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the removal of poker machines from all pubs and clubs and legislating for pre-commitments and $1 bet limits, as recommended by the 2010 Productivity Commission review.

The Greens will ensure that casinos have to contribute to the Community Support Levy.

Further exploration of innovative regulatory measures would be initiated, including measures such as quarantining winnings until the end of the session, using alarm clocks for setting time reminders, and requiring a “demo mode” which allows for playing without money.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men’s sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive “Nordic model” criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution.

Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support an end to the criminalisation of consensual adult sex work.

The Greens support the position of sex workers in Australia who are vehemently opposed to the introduction of the Swedish model in Australia, claiming it significantly increases the physical, financial and emotional risks to people who choose to do sex work, while providing no benefit or safety to the people who may be trying to escape it.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

The Tasmanian Greens seek to make a difference and leave the planet a better place for our children.