Know your Candidates

To help Tasmanians know more about the candidates who will vote on your behalf in Parliament, we wrote to all the candidates from all the parties to ask them about several issues that are important to Christians.

Below are the answers from candidates who provided responses to our questioning so far.

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elise.archer@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was educated and practised law in Tasmania, before being elected in 2010. In 2014 I became the first female Speaker and became Minister for Justice, Corrections, Environment and Parks, and the Arts in 2017. I entered politics to improve the lives of those less fortunate in my community; an ethos I developed early in life while volunteering for charities and working in my family’s small businesses. I have always had a strong community focus and on creating a strong economy to create jobs to support our health and education system and Tasmanians in need. I am happily married to Dale, and we both strongly value our family and community responsibilities.


What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate?

I want to continue to provide strong leadership and maintain a focus on providing a successful and confident future for all Tasmanians. In order to do this we must continue to build our strong economy by striving to be one of the most competitive places to do business, one with the right environment to encourage investment and jobs growth. Economic prosperity will allow us to better provide for Tasmanians doing it tough in our community and make Tasmania an even more affordable place in which to live.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have opposed each such Bill that came before me in my time as an elected member of Parliament (although I was unable to register a vote in the Speaker’s chair in 2017). I am opposed to legalising euthanasia.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

As a deeply committed, accessible and caring person who works hard in and for her community, to achieve the best possible outcomes.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

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simon.behrakis@aph.gov.au

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was born in Hobart and raised in a traditional Greek family. Since a very young age I was taught the importance of maintaining our Greek Orthodox traditions, especially the family values which have served us so well. I have a degree in economics and finance, and also grew up in a family small business, combining the theoretical with the practical.

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

To ensure that the economic growth and prosperity that Denison has enjoyed for the last four years continues into the future, but more importantly to ensure that our values and heritage, which we hold dear, are maintained. I would ensure that the history of our State and Nation is preserved rather than rewritten I also believe it is crucial that programs such as “Safe Schools” never find their way into the curriculum in our state, and I would oppose any move to implement gender theory in our schools. I would oppose any move to have the date of Australia Day changed.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I would oppose further attempts to legalise euthanasia. A caring and compassionate society would support patients and ease their suffering during such difficult times.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

As a servant leader who made it easier for people to go about their lives without undue interference, someone who protected the most vulnerable and as a defender of our God given freedoms.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Sue_Hickey_Template_1.jpg

sue.hickey@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was born the eldest of three girls and raised by hardworking but struggling young Catholic parents who taught me strong personal values.  I have a tremendous capacity for hard work and I like to achieve my goals.  My partner and I have four children between us and seven grandchildren (including two step grandchildren).  I have a great love of family and community.  I have been assisting my partner Peter who suffered Guillaine Barre syndrome (total body paralysis that left him in hospital for one year) in recovery so I am acutely aware of disability issues and the health system.

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

My priorities are affordable and social housing, mental illness, public safety, general health and wellness for the community, public transport, education and ensuring children don’t start the day hungry. 

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

When I am satisfied that all safeguards are enshrined and to world best practice I would not oppose any attempts to legalise euthanasia for those who are terminally ill.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I would like to be remembered as a person who made a real difference for her community due to her hard work, her ability to listen and because she followed her sense of justice; integrity; belief in equity for all and because she got things done that matter!

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Kristy_Johnson_Template_1.jpg

kristyjohnson7788@gmail.com

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.


I am a born and bred northern suburbs girl.  My family owned a small business in Claremont, a petrol station, and I began working there after school when I was 12.  Working at such a young age has given me a firm foundation in my work and moral ethics.  I now own two fitness centres with my business partners, in Glenorchy and Bellerive, which provide health and fitness to these local communities.  I have 10 year old twin girls, Lotti and Mia, who keep me on my toes everyday, and have recently become a single mother.  I am passionate about life and I never say no to a challenge.  Failure is learning how to do it better next time.

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

1) Finding a solution to generational issues, breaking a poverty mind-set and giving hope back to the community, including providing pathways for our younger generation to gain education and skills to give them lifelong opportunities for success, like apprenticeships and other forms of education such as TAFE, not just University.

2) Keeping our young people in school longer and reducing youth unemployment. As an employer, I have been shocked by the mindset of some young adults, who don’t seem to want to work full time or lack the persistence to improve their skills. Something has gone wrong somewhere, I seek an opportunity to find it and investigate how this can be changed.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

Euthanasia is a very emotional debate.  My personal values will always be to seek to preserve life.  I would have to view any legislation before I would consider changing something that goes beyond my value system.   My concern is that once euthanasia is legalised, lobby groups would seek to expand the laws.  I would not like to see Australia have laws similar to European countries where you can voluntarily end your life due to alcoholism or depression.  I believe we do much better in palliative care; pain relieving drugs are so advanced that all forms of pain can be addressed for those suffering.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

My aim is to be a strong, female voice in government.  I believe in small government, not an over-reaching one, where freedom of choice and freedom of speech is protected.  I want to see all generations being given hope to continually empower themselves to grow and be successful.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Dean_Young_Template_1.jpg

dean.young@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Born and raised in Tasmania, I am currently married to Allison with 3 children, James, Jefferson (4 1/2 twins) and Leonard (2 1/2). I am a qualified accountant, but currently own and run a newsagency in Glenorchy. I believe education to be extremely important in our children's future and I am passionate about small business and the role it plays in driving the economy. I have lived and worked outside of Tasmania, but having had children cannot imagine a better place to live and watch them grow. I decided to run for Parliament as I believe I have a varied background and am ideally placed to contribute to our society.

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

I want to continue with the current Hodgman Government’s school extension policy so that especially in the northern suburbs we can continue to shift the way that some people view education and schooling. Giving Tasmanians even more choice in what they want to do in their future is very important.  I would also want to encourage small business and help as many people as possible to realise the dream of owning their own business. This would also I believe help employ and train many families.

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

Oppose

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

A hardworking, caring and decent person who stood up for Tasmanians

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Cassy_O'Connor_450_x_600_Clean-scr.jpg

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Information about Tasmanian Greens candidates is available at: https://greens.org.au/candidates/tas  

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

A prosperous, low-carbon economy powered by renewable energy, and a passionate voice for people with disabilities, refugees, children and marginalized Tasmanians.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.

Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of Tasmanians suffering from advanced, incurable, unrelievable suffering that palliation cannot alleviate to choose the time and manner of their death.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs.

Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support treating personal drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal issue.

The Greens will:

  • uphold criminal penalties, including imprisonment, for the supply of illicit drugs and the possession of illicit drugs above quantities consistent with personal use;
  • legislate civil sanctions for the personal use of illicit drugs to include diversion programs, compulsory treatment, education programs and penalties;
  • provide increased availability of diversion to rehabilitation, treatment and recovery programs as a sentencing alternative for people convicted of possession for personal use;

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania’s abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth.

Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post-24 weeks) abortions except when a mother’s life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Greens would oppose an amendment to repeal the provision of late term abortions. It is inconsistent with good medical practice for the following reasons:

  • it imposes an arbitrary definition of ‘late term’—24 weeks—which is inconsistent with best medical practice;
  • it attempts to legislate health care, and it will have many unintended consequences, including undermining the professional relationship between a patient and her doctor by requiring the doctor to do certain things even when those things are against his or her professional or ethical judgement; and
  • it does not take into account the last decades of advances in the way all aspects of pregnancy, including premature births, are now dealt with.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations’ current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

The Tasmanian Greens do not support any weakening of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998.

 

Do you agree with state funding of educational programmes that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme)?

Fact: Safe Schools does not teach radical gender theory. It is simply a program to help schools and students understand and respect that people should not be discriminated against for any reason - including gender and sexual diversity.

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of every child to feel safe from bullying, particularly at school.

The Safe Schools programme has been designed to ensure schools are safe places for all students, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) students, and are free of discrimination.

It was born out of the need identified by school communities, parents and teachers for greater support for LGBTI students, who are at higher risks of bullying and suicide, and to ensure that schools create safe and inclusive environments.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers.

A. Do you support legislating for a $1 bet limit?

B. What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the removal of poker machines from all pubs and clubs and legislating for pre-commitments and $1 bet limits, as recommended by the 2010 Productivity Commission review.

The Greens will ensure that casinos have to contribute to the Community Support Levy.

Further exploration of innovative regulatory measures would be initiated, including measures such as quarantining winnings until the end of the session, using alarm clocks for setting time reminders, and requiring a “demo mode” which allows for playing without money.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men’s sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive “Nordic model” criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution.

Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support an end to the criminalisation of consensual adult sex work.

The Greens support the position of sex workers in Australia who are vehemently opposed to the introduction of the Swedish model in Australia, claiming it significantly increases the physical, financial and emotional risks to people who choose to do sex work, while providing no benefit or safety to the people who may be trying to escape it.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

The Tasmanian Greens seek to make a difference and leave the planet a better place for our children.

Lorraine_Bennett.jpg

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Ran my own recruiting company for 10 years, company was merged with another company, where I was employed for another 5 years. I am recently retired and wanted to be involved in shaping our state. Hence joining the Shooters, Fishers & Farmers Party Tasmania.  I have been state secretary for 2.5 years and now am a candidate for Denison.


What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate?

As a state Politician I would like to have an open door approach with the electorate. I feel the councils are more at the coal face than state politicians.  I would like to have close working relationship with all councils state level. 

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

On a personal level I don’t know how anyone can let a terminally ill person suffer unnecessarily. Having said that, should this be a government decision or a decision between drs and families?  Our party will vote on this as their own conscious dictates.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

Deciding to take/or not to take Drugs is a personal choice.  The issues as I see it is we the public have to pick up the pieces of shattered lives of the hardened drug users.  We have found in the past making legislation to ban something does not stop the problems.  All it does is fill our courts, gives lawyers a job and fills our coffers in the way of fines (if they pay them) and fills our jails which again the man in the street pays for. Educating the public is how we need to address this issue.  Not one campaign, ongoing education capturing each generation until it becomes a norm not to use drugs.  I am against “safe shoot up rooms” rather give the pensioners who have paid taxes all their live free medication in their twilight years. 

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

What an emotive issue.  I feel I cannot answer this question as I have not walked a mile in the mothers’ shoes who feel this is their only option.  This would be a conscious vote.  However, on a personal level I oppose late abortions with exceptions as noted above.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Yes

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

Difficult question.  Personal view is as follows:

Our young children are at school to learn and expand their knowledge, they have an open mind and will take on board what an adult says.  My concerns are the wrong message may trigger wrong responses adding confusion for the child.  If this program was directed to an older group mid-teens and be open to those who feel a need for the program.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

We do have a gaming policy, we feel it is a personal choice to use gaming machines.  Having said that we don’t want to ban them.  Rather we would like to work with the addicted people to help with their mental health issues that cause addiction.  If the gaming machines are removed the addicted person is still addicted and will turn to on line gaming.  In this instance they will become more isolated and we cannot fix what is hidden.  Also, the money goes overseas.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

I feel the Nordic approach is fair and reasonable in short as a candidate I support it.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I would like to be remembers as one who thought long term (25 years) into the future by planning for population growth.  Planning for energy requirements, alternatives, housing and food. Rather than making a big splash in four years.