Know your Candidates

To help Tasmanians know more about the candidates who will vote on your behalf in Parliament, we wrote to all the candidates from all the parties to ask them about several issues that are important to Christians.

Below are the answers from candidates who provided responses to our questioning so far.

Claire_Chandler_Template_1.jpg

claire.chandler@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I'm a proud Tasmanian, having grown up in the Huon Valley and now living in Blackmans Bay with my fiance, Chris. I work as a senior analyst in Deloitte's Hobart practice, and previously studied Law at the University of Tasmania. I joined the Liberal Party while I was at University and was elected Federal President of the Young Liberal Movement of Australia in 2016.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate?

To provide every Franklin student with access to a quality education, by extending all high schools to year 12 in the electorate by 2022. 

To ensure our community is safe by advocating for more investment in local police for areas that need it most.

​​

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

First and foremost, I support the Liberal Party's long-term position of providing its Members with a conscience vote on euthanasia. I do not support euthanasia and would not support any further attempts to change the current laws in Tasmania.

​​

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

If I'm fortunate enough to be elected, I would want to be known and remembered as a politician who has clearly articulated values and fights for them, whatever the political cost. More broadly, I know the Hodgman Liberal team has a clear vision for Tasmania's future, and anything I can do to see the realisation of that vision is something for which I'd be proud to be known.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Simon_Duffy_Template_1.jpg

simon.duffy@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was born with a disability to a 17 year old single mother and spent time in the care of the state, being fostered and later adopted. I grew up in Warrane, where my mother worked as a community nurse and my father worked at Cadburys. This beginning put me on a path of knowing I had been given an opportunity that many others had not, which led to me working as a youth worker for many years, including street youth work and managing Hobart City Council’s Youth ARC for five years.  This is still what motivates me to give back now. My desire is to give back to the community by doing all I can to create opportunities for the battlers in our community to have better lives.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate?

The top two priorities I would like to focus on for Franklin would be cost of living and opportunities for young people.  I would like us to continue to put downward pressure on power prices and government services to assist people with their household costs.  I would also like to see us continue to increase the retention rate of young people in years 11 and 12, and get our youth employment rate down.  This can be achieved through increasing apprenticeships and traineeships as well as growing employment in small business.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

This is a very personal and emotional issue for many Tasmanians and I have nothing but compassion for those who have wrestled with these questions personally.  Due to my own experiences of hospitalisation, I am a strong supporter of palliative care.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I would like to be remembered as the kind of person who listened, helped and made a difference for the battler.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Will_Hodgman_1.jpg

will.hodgman@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

 

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I am a proud Tasmanian and I want our State to be the very best it can be. I grew up at beautiful Kingston Beach, and have lived and worked here most of my life.  After graduating from UTas I spent a couple of years working in England UK as a prosecutor in child protection cases. While there I met my beautiful wife, Nicky, and we returned to Tasmania in 1998 to live. We have three children, William, James and Lily. My family is the most important thing to me, and they are my inspiration. I stood at the 2002 election because I want to help make Tasmania an even better place to live, and that is still my motivation.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

To ensure that people in our community have the best possible services, like the best possible education for our kids or good health care for people.

I want our economy to continue to grow, because it means we are then able to invest more into the essential services our community needs and to keep the cost of living down. While our economy is much stronger now than when we came into government, my vision is for it to be consistently ranked amongst the best performing in the country, supporting more local businesses and jobs for Tasmanians.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have opposed legislation in 2009, 2013 and 2017 because of its serious shortcomings.  I will assess any future legislation on its merits. 

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

As one who helped make our State an even better place to live, work and raise a family. As the leader of a strong team that in Government has changed the direction our State was heading in, making it a much more confident, prouder, stronger place to be.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Jacquie_Petrusma_Template_1.jpg

jacquie.petrusma@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was born in Launceston and trained at the LGH as a Registered Nurse before shifting to Hobart with my first daughter.  I worked in health related areas until elected in March 2010. I have completed a business degree, worked as a National Sales Manager in a global medical company, and owned my own business.  My husband is also an RN and we have three children.  From my life experience, as well as from studying an education degree, I’m very interested in policies that will strengthen and support families. health, education, cost of living, family violence, aged care, and people with disability.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

To build everyone’s future in strong communities and make Tasmania the best state in Australia in which to work, live and raise a family.  This will be assisted by growing a stronger economy, which will not only create more jobs and employment for Tasmanians, but will give us more money to invest into essential services such as health and helping and assisting our most in need and most vulnerable.  Also, by taking greater action on the rising cost of living, affordable housing, keeping Tasmanians safe, and giving our children and young people the best possible start in life and education.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I would strongly oppose and vote against any attempts to legalise euthanasia as I did in 2013 and 2017. As an RN who worked in aged care and looked after countless people receiving palliative care, I am a passionate advocate for the need to ensure that we continue to research, use and promote world's best practice palliative care that will negate any need for assisted suicide.  I also believe in the dignity of human life and that euthanasia poses too great a threat to our most vulnerable – especially people with physical and mental disability, the elderly, children and young people. 

 

10: How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

Hard working, compassionate, and trustworthy Member of Parliament, who worked for the good of my constituents and stood up for the Christian worldview, and defended the values, rights and freedoms that are important to me, including freedom of speech, freedom of religion, parental rights, protecting and assisting our most vulnerable and the dignity of human life. 

To be known for my conviction, integrity and courage to battle for justice, truth and the heart and soul of Tasmania, and for safeguarding protections as shown by my advocacy and voting record on issues such as same sex marriage, euthanasia, abortion, adoption, anti-discrimination, surrogacy and family violence.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Nic_Street_Template_1.jpg

nic.street@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

Born and lived in Kingston and Blackmans Bay all my life, I went through Catholic schools for all of my education before attending the University of Tasmania where I obtained a Bachelor of Commerce.  After leaving university I ran my own business for nearly 12 years before entering politics, first at Kingborough Council and now State Parliament.  Away from work I am basically a sports fanatic with an interest in pretty much any sport you can think of

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

To make sure that Tasmania is well placed to take advantage of the social and economic opportunities that are available to us and to ensure that as much as possible Tasmanians are free to make their own choices with a little government intervention as practical

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I supported the Dying with Dignity legislation in 2017 and providing any future legislation met my level of scrutiny I would do so again

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I would like to be remembered as someone who stood by the courage of his convictions.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Rosalie_Woodruff._450_x_600_Clean-scr.jpg

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Information about Tasmanian Greens candidates is available at: https://greens.org.au/candidates/tas  

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

A prosperous, low-carbon economy powered by renewable energy, and a passionate voice for people with disabilities, refugees, children and marginalized Tasmanians.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.

Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of Tasmanians suffering from advanced, incurable, unrelievable suffering that palliation cannot alleviate to choose the time and manner of their death.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs.

Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support treating personal drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal issue.

The Greens will:

  • uphold criminal penalties, including imprisonment, for the supply of illicit drugs and the possession of illicit drugs above quantities consistent with personal use;
  • legislate civil sanctions for the personal use of illicit drugs to include diversion programs, compulsory treatment, education programs and penalties;
  • provide increased availability of diversion to rehabilitation, treatment and recovery programs as a sentencing alternative for people convicted of possession for personal use;

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania’s abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth.

Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post-24 weeks) abortions except when a mother’s life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Greens would oppose an amendment to repeal the provision of late term abortions. It is inconsistent with good medical practice for the following reasons:

  • it imposes an arbitrary definition of ‘late term’—24 weeks—which is inconsistent with best medical practice;
  • it attempts to legislate health care, and it will have many unintended consequences, including undermining the professional relationship between a patient and her doctor by requiring the doctor to do certain things even when those things are against his or her professional or ethical judgement; and
  • it does not take into account the last decades of advances in the way all aspects of pregnancy, including premature births, are now dealt with.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations’ current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

The Tasmanian Greens do not support any weakening of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998.

 

Do you agree with state funding of educational programmes that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme)?

Fact: Safe Schools does not teach radical gender theory. It is simply a program to help schools and students understand and respect that people should not be discriminated against for any reason - including gender and sexual diversity.

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of every child to feel safe from bullying, particularly at school.

The Safe Schools programme has been designed to ensure schools are safe places for all students, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) students, and are free of discrimination.

It was born out of the need identified by school communities, parents and teachers for greater support for LGBTI students, who are at higher risks of bullying and suicide, and to ensure that schools create safe and inclusive environments.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers.

A. Do you support legislating for a $1 bet limit?

B. What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the removal of poker machines from all pubs and clubs and legislating for pre-commitments and $1 bet limits, as recommended by the 2010 Productivity Commission review.

The Greens will ensure that casinos have to contribute to the Community Support Levy.

Further exploration of innovative regulatory measures would be initiated, including measures such as quarantining winnings until the end of the session, using alarm clocks for setting time reminders, and requiring a “demo mode” which allows for playing without money.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men’s sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive “Nordic model” criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution.

Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support an end to the criminalisation of consensual adult sex work.

The Greens support the position of sex workers in Australia who are vehemently opposed to the introduction of the Swedish model in Australia, claiming it significantly increases the physical, financial and emotional risks to people who choose to do sex work, while providing no benefit or safety to the people who may be trying to escape it.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

The Tasmanian Greens seek to make a difference and leave the planet a better place for our children.