Know your Candidates

To help Tasmanians know more about the candidates who will vote on your behalf in Parliament, we wrote to all the candidates from all the parties to ask them about several issues that are important to Christians.

Below are the answers from candidates who provided responses to our questioning so far.

Guy_Barnett_Template_1.jpg

guy.barnett@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

Born and raised in the electorate of Lyons, I have been advocating for the needs of regional Tasmania for most of my life.  I studied law at the University of Tasmania, and ran an award-winning business before representing Tasmania in the Senate for almost a decade.  I am committed to my family, Christian values and want the best for our community.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

I want to help build stronger, more caring communities in Lyons and play my part in helping the people, businesses and communities of Lyons reach their full potential.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have opposed previous attempts to legalise euthanasia in both the Federal and State Parliaments, and will continue to do so.  In my opinion, euthanasia would deliver a less caring, less compassionate and less just society.  I would not support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

As one who listened and cared, with a proactive and can-do attitude, and who made a real difference to our community.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Rene_Hidding_Template_1.jpg

rene.hidding@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I am the third son of a family that migrated from the Netherlands in 1956 and settled in Northern Tasmania joining with a group of others connected to the family’s church in the homeland.  My previous work life was mostly in self-employment, particularly in the family’s business interests in building and hardware sectors.

I served on the Launceston City Council from 1985 before being elected to the House of Assembly in 1996.  My wife, Shirley, and I recently celebrated our 45th wedding anniversary with our four adult children, and spouses and 13 grandchildren.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

In the Lyons electorate, I aspire to see all high schools offering education through to year 12, utilising positive partnerships with other schools and colleges to offer students a wide range of subjects.     I want to see local young people that are confident, literate and numerate graduating into higher education for full time productive employment.

Further, I want to continue to promote respect for every citizen’s personal safety and private property through strong law and order and justice policies.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have led or coordinated most of the “No” campaigns against five attempts to legislate for Government-provided suicide in Tasmania.  I will continue to highlight the shocking abuses in places where such laws exist and will always stand up for the principle of the sanctity of life.

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I feel that it would be a blessing if any legacy reflected on my career as a diligent, hardworking, values-based Parliamentarian who always fought hard for traditional family values, and God honouring-laws.  

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

 

Jane_Howlett_Template_1.jpg

jane.howlett@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was born and raised on a farm in Richmond, with strong Christian values that I have been privileged to share with my husband and two young children. Through my career in small business, I have learned the importance of hard work and the value of giving back to the community.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

My aim is to continue to grow jobs through Tasmania and its regions and develop new opportunities for our communities. I am also passionate about enhancing the education system to give our youth the best start in life, to gain employment and raise their own families in our beautiful state.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I do not see a circumstance in which any future euthanasia legislation would receive my support.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

If successful in my candidacy, I would want to be remembered for achieving for my community, for being accessible and respected for my integrity and remaining true to my own values.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Mark_Shelton_Template1.jpg

mark.shelton@parliament.tas.gov.au

Check out candidates’ voting record on marriage, abortion and euthanasia HERE.

 

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was educated at the Bracknell Primary School and the Cressy District High School and gained qualifications as a motor mechanic.  I went on to gain a Diploma of Teaching at the University of Tasmania, and became a TAFE automotive instructor for 20 years.  As a former Mayor of Meander Valley Council, I understand local issues, have assisted many families, and this work has continued in State Parliament.   I believe that Members of Parliament use their community profiles with purpose and it was with this in mind I set out on a recent charity walk from Longford to Hobart, raising more than $21,000 for St Giles.   My wife Merrilyn and I enjoy spending time with family, along with outdoor activities such as boating, golf and gardening.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

Continue building economic growth within our regions.  Encourage more people to live and stay in Tasmania.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I have consistently voted against euthanasia.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

Honest and hard working.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

John_Tucker_Template1.jpg

john.tucker@tas.liberal.org.au

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

My family were the second settlers in Scottsdale, working in and around the Scottsdale and St Helens region pioneering many activities, such as coastal shipping, tin mining and farming.  I was born on 22 January 1975 and spent my early days on the farm at the Gardens, north of St Helens, with my parents John and Maureen, and three older sisters, Georgina, Louise and Patricia.   Due to our isolation, my mother home-schooled my sisters until I, as youngest, was old enough to attend school.  I attended St Helens District High School for primary school, then followed a family tradition of four generations by attending Launceston Church Grammar School as a boarder.  After graduating, I spent 3 years working on the family farm at The Gardens.  In 1995, I attended Lincoln Agricultural College in New Zealand, graduating in 1996 with a Diploma of Agriculture, and then returned home to the farm.

I Married Mhari in 2003 and we have four children, Elizabeth, Angus, Campbell and Posie.  I now continue to run the Antu Cattle Company over three properties in far north eastern Tasmania, as well as being a Councillor for the Break O’Day municipality.   We are currently diversifying into free range, pasture-reared pigs.  My primary interests are the farm, farming welfare, and my family.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

Review the Forest Practices Act to make it more balanced towards agricultural resources in Tasmania, with a view of achieving the Liberals’ goal of $10 billion agricultural production by 2050.

Work with mental health professionals to develop communications within rural and regional communities to achieve better support for clients and their families around mental health, and to provide a clearer pathway for positive outcomes for all those impacted by mental health issues.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I am pro-life and as such, do not support euthanasia.  My family’s experiences with terminal illness and the dying process have led me to believe strongly in the importance of quality palliative care.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I would like to be remembered as a visionary who always looked to the future for better outcomes for all Tasmanian communities, in particular around securing agricultural resources and mental health services and initiatives.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

 

Fraser_Brindley_450_x_600_Clean-scr.jpg

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Information about Tasmanian Greens candidates is available at: https://greens.org.au/candidates/tas  

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

A prosperous, low-carbon economy powered by renewable energy, and a passionate voice for people with disabilities, refugees, children and marginalized Tasmanians.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.

Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of Tasmanians suffering from advanced, incurable, unrelievable suffering that palliation cannot alleviate to choose the time and manner of their death.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs.

Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support treating personal drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal issue.

The Greens will:

  • uphold criminal penalties, including imprisonment, for the supply of illicit drugs and the possession of illicit drugs above quantities consistent with personal use;
  • legislate civil sanctions for the personal use of illicit drugs to include diversion programs, compulsory treatment, education programs and penalties;
  • provide increased availability of diversion to rehabilitation, treatment and recovery programs as a sentencing alternative for people convicted of possession for personal use;

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania’s abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth.

Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post-24 weeks) abortions except when a mother’s life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Greens would oppose an amendment to repeal the provision of late term abortions. It is inconsistent with good medical practice for the following reasons:

  • it imposes an arbitrary definition of ‘late term’—24 weeks—which is inconsistent with best medical practice;
  • it attempts to legislate health care, and it will have many unintended consequences, including undermining the professional relationship between a patient and her doctor by requiring the doctor to do certain things even when those things are against his or her professional or ethical judgement; and
  • it does not take into account the last decades of advances in the way all aspects of pregnancy, including premature births, are now dealt with.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations’ current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

The Tasmanian Greens do not support any weakening of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998.

 

Do you agree with state funding of educational programmes that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme)?

Fact: Safe Schools does not teach radical gender theory. It is simply a program to help schools and students understand and respect that people should not be discriminated against for any reason - including gender and sexual diversity.

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the right of every child to feel safe from bullying, particularly at school.

The Safe Schools programme has been designed to ensure schools are safe places for all students, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) students, and are free of discrimination.

It was born out of the need identified by school communities, parents and teachers for greater support for LGBTI students, who are at higher risks of bullying and suicide, and to ensure that schools create safe and inclusive environments.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers.

A. Do you support legislating for a $1 bet limit?

B. What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support the removal of poker machines from all pubs and clubs and legislating for pre-commitments and $1 bet limits, as recommended by the 2010 Productivity Commission review.

The Greens will ensure that casinos have to contribute to the Community Support Levy.

Further exploration of innovative regulatory measures would be initiated, including measures such as quarantining winnings until the end of the session, using alarm clocks for setting time reminders, and requiring a “demo mode” which allows for playing without money.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men’s sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive “Nordic model” criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution.

Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Tasmanian Greens strongly support an end to the criminalisation of consensual adult sex work.

The Greens support the position of sex workers in Australia who are vehemently opposed to the introduction of the Swedish model in Australia, claiming it significantly increases the physical, financial and emotional risks to people who choose to do sex work, while providing no benefit or safety to the people who may be trying to escape it.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

The Tasmanian Greens seek to make a difference and leave the planet a better place for our children.

Wayne_Turale.jpg

Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Answer pending.


What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate?

The top 2 priorities for social policy are Health and Child Protection.  We want a bi partisan approach to both of these portfolios .  The best minds of all elected parties need to collaborate to plan a constructive plan for the future in both of these areas.  Health must have some hard discussions about hospital numbers, locations  and resources.  The old way of doing business with one Party politicking with Health has shown to be a consistent failure, wasting millions of $,  patient suffering and burn out for our medical staff.  We must change the way we assess and  plan to address this.

Rural Tasmanians have lost so much over the past decade and we must re address this.   Rural/regional policy is attracting business back to those communities by proper promotion and protection of traditional activities camping, fishing, 4 wd , and hunting.  Improving roads and local infrastructure for tourism.  Promoting the farming agriculture sector,

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

This is an ongoing debate.  In theory a competent, lucid terminally ill person, suffering untreatable pain,  should have the choice to determine the manner in which they spend their last hours.  There would however must be stringent control over this process and also religious beliefs must be taken into account.  Also Palliative care option must be fully explored and considered.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

SFFP will not support decriminalization of illegal drugs.  We will push for increased funding for treatment and de toxification centres and also harsher penalties for convicted drug traffickers.

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

Yes.  Support an amendment to repeal the provision of late term abortions.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Yes  Faith Based organization should have the CHOICE of who they employ, engage.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

No we do not.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

We do not agree to the current  Labor /Green plan to remove poker machines.  No Government sponsored program has ever been successful in compensating business or persons for removing an industry.   SFFP is philosophically opposed to ANY plan for Govt using public funds to buy out a business.

Using $55M of public funds for this is an extravagant misdirection of public funds.  It simply costs local employment and is not a true long term solution

SFFP believes that this measure will not be ultimately successful as many will use other forms of gaming , such as on line as simply as accessing their phones.  It is of note that Labor still allows machines on the Spirit of Tasmania as well as casino  This is illogical to us as targeting tourists to spend funds prior to entering the State does not support local business.
Previous governments have legalized poker machines and allowed them to be part of business plans for many rural and regional business.  

The recent Forestry Re structure is a classic example of a failed program,  The many people who deserved and were targeted recipients of these funds never received or received very little.  Hundreds of thousands of $ was mis- directed.

This current policy targets small rural and regional business while protecting the major Gaming companies.

SFFP believes while legal, business and patrons should have the right to CHOOSE  whether or not to have poker machines as part of their business or leisure activity.  If Poker machines are to be made illegal it should be across the board to ALL parties and premises Statewide.

SFFP believes the way forward is ..

1.  Increasing the funds received from the Gaming Taxes which are directed to Gaming addictive behaviour programs and agencies.  Increasing resources, agencies.

2.  Spending some of the claimed $55 m in a long term (10 yr + )  gaming awareness program , similar to the Anti smoking program.  This can be inclusive of restrictions on electronic attractions on machines in a similar way cigarette packaging was removed.  Educating people from these addictive behavior's is a long term solution, as the gaming market declines gradually, the business can adapt to the change.

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

Yes.  Human trafficking is still a world wide issue and the public in Tasmania would be naïve to think that Criminal elements are not active in that field here.   The vulnerable in our community deserve all the protection that can be given.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

Honesty and Integrity.  Two commodities that cant be bought or traded for.