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Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Ran my own recruiting company for 10 years, company was merged with another company, where I was employed for another 5 years. I am recently retired and wanted to be involved in shaping our state. Hence joining the Shooters, Fishers & Farmers Party Tasmania.  I have been state secretary for 2.5 years and now am a candidate for Denison.


What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate?

As a state Politician I would like to have an open door approach with the electorate. I feel the councils are more at the coal face than state politicians.  I would like to have close working relationship with all councils state level. 

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017. Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

On a personal level I don’t know how anyone can let a terminally ill person suffer unnecessarily. Having said that, should this be a government decision or a decision between drs and families?  Our party will vote on this as their own conscious dictates.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

Deciding to take/or not to take Drugs is a personal choice.  The issues as I see it is we the public have to pick up the pieces of shattered lives of the hardened drug users.  We have found in the past making legislation to ban something does not stop the problems.  All it does is fill our courts, gives lawyers a job and fills our coffers in the way of fines (if they pay them) and fills our jails which again the man in the street pays for. Educating the public is how we need to address this issue.  Not one campaign, ongoing education capturing each generation until it becomes a norm not to use drugs.  I am against “safe shoot up rooms” rather give the pensioners who have paid taxes all their live free medication in their twilight years. 

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

What an emotive issue.  I feel I cannot answer this question as I have not walked a mile in the mothers’ shoes who feel this is their only option.  This would be a conscious vote.  However, on a personal level I oppose late abortions with exceptions as noted above.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Yes

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

Difficult question.  Personal view is as follows:

Our young children are at school to learn and expand their knowledge, they have an open mind and will take on board what an adult says.  My concerns are the wrong message may trigger wrong responses adding confusion for the child.  If this program was directed to an older group mid-teens and be open to those who feel a need for the program.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

We do have a gaming policy, we feel it is a personal choice to use gaming machines.  Having said that we don’t want to ban them.  Rather we would like to work with the addicted people to help with their mental health issues that cause addiction.  If the gaming machines are removed the addicted person is still addicted and will turn to on line gaming.  In this instance they will become more isolated and we cannot fix what is hidden.  Also, the money goes overseas.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

I feel the Nordic approach is fair and reasonable in short as a candidate I support it.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

I would like to be remembers as one who thought long term (25 years) into the future by planning for population growth.  Planning for energy requirements, alternatives, housing and food. Rather than making a big splash in four years. 

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[email protected]

Please tell us a little about yourself, upbringing, family, interests etc.

I was born and raised on a farm in Richmond, with strong Christian values that I have been privileged to share with my husband and two young children. Through my career in small business, I have learned the importance of hard work and the value of giving back to the community.

 

What are the top two priorities you want to achieve for your electorate

My aim is to continue to grow jobs through Tasmania and its regions and develop new opportunities for our communities. I am also passionate about enhancing the education system to give our youth the best start in life, to gain employment and raise their own families in our beautiful state.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by the Tasmanian Parliaments in 1998, 2009, 2013 and 2017.  Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

I do not see a circumstance in which any future euthanasia legislation would receive my support.

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

If successful in my candidacy, I would want to be remembered for achieving for my community, for being accessible and respected for my integrity and remaining true to my own values.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs. Would you support or oppose legislation to enable this?

The Tasmanian Liberals will not decriminalise illicit drugs, nor introduce legislation to do so. Nor will we support legislation introduced by another political party.

Illicit drug use can lead to significant social problems, including family violence and child abuse. We will reduce the supply, demand and harms associated with the abuse and misuse of illicit drugs. See www.tas.liberal.org.au for all election policies.

In contrast, the Greens have a clear policy to remove criminal penalties for personal illicit drug use and in 2017, Labor voted in favour of the "decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs".

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania's abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth. Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term (post 24 weeks) abortions except when a mother's life is in danger?

The Tasmanian Liberals have no plans to change the current laws. Should another political party bring such laws to Parliament, my Members will be allowed a conscience vote, as they have in previous years when legislation related to the termination of pregnancy has been debated.

 

Do you support faith-based organisations' current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Such rights already exist. Faith-based organisations are able to seek exemption from the Anti-Discrimination Act, subject to conditions set by the independent Commissioner, and limited to a period of not more than three years. Extensions can be sought. Exemptions enable faithbased organisations to employ persons based on religion or participation in religious observance.

 

Do you agree with state funding of education programs that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme?)

The Liberals will continue to provide safe and supportive learning environments, for all students and staff. We have put in place a new $3 million Combatting Bullying Initiative that will provide practical support to schools to ensure that all students feel safe and valued in their school community.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers. Do you support legislation for a $ I bet limit? What other measures do you support to help at-risk Tasmanians and their families?

The Liberals' policy is available at www.tas.liberal.org.au

Tasmania's harm minimisation framework is already recognised as national best practice and

99.5% of Tasmanians are not problem gamblers. The Liberals will:

  • reduce the cap on poker machines by 150;
  • end the monopoly;
  • allow venues to licence, own and operate machines, increasing returns to pubs and clubs to invest in economic activity and jobs;
  • increase returns for government to invest in schools and hospitals;
  • double the Community Support Levy to around $9 million per year, providing a bigger pool for harm minimisation, preventative health and support for community sporting activities and facilities.

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men's sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive "Nordic model" criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution. Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

The Liberal Party has no plans to change existing laws

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Please tell us a little about yourself – your upbringing, family, interests etc.

Born in Rotterdam, grew up on north west coast dairy farms, married to Tosca, 5 children, 3 grandchildren. Interests include home renovations, bushwak=lking, scuba diving, boating. Career police officer retiring at the rank of Commander (Counter-Terrorism), then 6 years as the Legislative Council member for Rumney.

 

What are the top two priorities that you want to achieve for your electorate?

The role of the Upper House is to keep a check on executive government, it is the role of the lower house to propose policy and programs.

 

Euthanasia has been rejected by Tasmanian parliaments in 2009, 2013 and 2017.

Would you oppose or support any future attempts to legalise euthanasia in Tasmania?

Yes, with appropriate safeguards to prevent ‘convenience killings’. It already occurs with palliative use of morphine. Safeguards include a ‘will type arrangement where one decides before the age of 70, the circumstances under which active euthanasia could occur.

 

Drugs continue to wreak havoc in our community. Some are suggesting the decriminalisation of small volume use and possession of illicit drugs.

Indeed – prohibition has failed.  Supply side measures for any addiction are doomed to failure and simply fuel organised crime.  Harm reduction is best achieved through education – it’s a long haul, but as with tobacco it is eventually reverses the trend.

 

According to a 2013 Galaxy poll, the majority of Tasmanians oppose late term abortions except in cases of severe disability. Despite this, Tasmania’s abortion law continues to allow abortion up until birth.

I do not support abortion after 13 weeks.  In fact I amended the current law to allow Christian counsellors to continue to assist pregnant mothers.

 

Would you support or oppose an amendment to legislation to repeal the provision of late term abortions (post 24 week when a baby can survive outside the womb) except when a mother’s life is in danger?

Do you support faith-based organisations’ current right to, if they so choose, restrict employment or enrolment to those who share their ethos, just like political parties do?

Yes

 

Do you agree with state funding of educational programmes that teach contested gender theory (like the so called Safe Schools Programme)?

No in primary schools, yes in high schools.

 

Poker machines cause a great deal of social harm to vulnerable Tasmanians. Over $15 million is lost monthly on poker machines in Tasmania, with a significant portion of this attributed to the estimated 8000 problem or moderate-risk gamblers.

Would you support legislating for $1 bet limits (down from the current $5 bet limit)?

No. Problem gambling is an addiction and restrictions of this kind simply drive it to other forms of gambling.  We need to tackle the demand side, not the supply side. I suggest licensing gamblers, so performance can be monitored.  Imaging a situation where the gambler inserts his card into a machine, enters their pin number and is then confronted with a statement of their losses and asked whether they wish to proceed. 

 

Prostitution degrades women by objectifying them as commodities for men’s sexual gratification. Internationally, policies discouraging demand for sexual services are proving to be the most effective way of limiting both the size of and the harms resulting from prostitution. The progressive “Nordic model” criminalises the buyer of sex, not the provider, and provides viable pathways for those wishing to exit prostitution.

Would you support an inquiry into the suitability of the Nordic approach to help vulnerable women in Tasmania?

No.  It is a lovely theory, but a visit to Nordic countries will see they have a lively prostitution industry where the authorities are aware of just how unenforceable these rules are. Remember that we live in a fallen world!

 

How would you like to be remembered as a politician?

A straight shooter who called it as he saw it, recognising that the world isn’t a perfect place, that I don’t have all the answers and that I shouldn’t be imposing non-victimless morality on people who don’t share my faith. I hope when Muslims become a majority, they don’t impose theirs on me.